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Exploring Solutions to Ocean Plastics: Supporting Southeast Asia's Informal Waste Sector - October 2020

Exploring Solutions to Ocean Plastics: Supporting Southeast Asia's Informal Waste Sector - October 2020
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Exploring Solutions to Ocean Plastics: Supporting Southeast Asia's Informal Waste Sector
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Exploring solutions to ocean plastics: Supporting Southeast Asia's Informal Waste Sector - October 2020

ReSource

Project description

ReSource seeks to activate large-scale circular solutions on plastics in consumer-oriented sectors that maximize, measure, and multiply both environmental and social benefits. 

 

Location

Global

 

Partners

World Wildlife Fund (leading partner

Keurig Dr Pepper

McDonald’s

Procter & Gamble

Starbucks

Tetra Pak

The Coca-Cola Company,

Ellen Macarthur Foundation

Ocean Conservancy

Colgate-Palmolive

Kimberly-Clark

 

 

 

Plastics Policy Playbook and Implementation

This Action aligns with the following Calls to Action from the Circular Economy Action Agenda for Plastics

5. Guide and Support New Business Models for Environmental, Financial, and Social Triple-Win

6. Set up Functioning Collection Systems

9. Integrate and Advance Decent Work in the Transition to a Circular Economy for Plastics

10. Investigate Environmental and Socio-Economic Impacts of Renewable Material Inputs for Plastics;

 

Project description

Plastics Policy Playbook and Implementation seeks to improve ollection and put an end to marine plastics by innovating public/private policy measures for government and business and engaging with governments (including cities through Urban Ocean), business, and NGOs to keep trash out of the ocean.

 

Location

Global

 

Partners

Ocean Conservancy (leading partner)

Accenture

The Trash Free Seas Alliance © 

The Resilient Cities Network 

The Circulate Initiative 

The Centre for Marinelife Conservation (Vietnam) 

 

Partner Logos
Ocean Conservancy Logo
Accenture Logo
The Trash Free Seas Alliance © Logo
The Resilient Cities Network Logo
The Circular Initative logo
The Centre for Marinelife Conservation (Vietnam) Logo

Consumers Beyond Disposability

Project description

Consumers Beyond Disposability seeks to catalyze large-scale adoption of new waste reduction solutions such as Loop, which seeks to shift consumer consumption from disposable to durable packaging solutions. 

 

Location

Currently the United States and France

 

Partners

World Economic Forum (Leading Foundation)

Ellen MacArthur Foundation

City of Paris

NYC Mayor’s Office of Sustainability

PepsiCo

P&G

TerraCycle

Greenpeace

WWF

UNEP 

Unilever

Algramo

Nestle 

Closed Loop Partners

Kearney

 

 

 

New Plastics Economy

This Action aligns with the following Calls to Action from the Circular Economy Action Agenda for Plastics:

1. Agree Which Plastics Can be Eliminated and Prepare the Market to Phase Them Out

2. Incentivize and Support Product Design for Reuse and Recycling of Plastics

6. Set up Functioning Collection Systems

 

Project description

Over the past four years, the Ellen MacArthur Foundation’s New Plastics Economy initiative has rallied businesses and governments behind a positive vision of a circular economy for plastics. Its 2016 and 2017 New Plastics Economy reports captured worldwide headlines, revealing the financial and environmental costs of waste plastic and pollution. In the last year, it has brought together 15 leading companies committed to work towards 100% reusable, recyclable, or compostable plastic packaging by 2025. The Global Commitment takes this work to the next level – creating a global coalition of leaders with the power to prevent plastic pollution at the source.

 

Long term ambition of New Plastics Economy

Create unstoppable momentum towards a plastics system that works.

 

Context

If we don’t act now, by 2040 the amount of plastic entering the ocean each year will triple, putting us well on the way to an ocean with more plastic than fish by 2050.

 

But we cannot simply recycle or reduce our way out of the plastic pollution crisis. We need a circular economy for plastic, in which it never becomes waste or pollution.

 

We must take three actions to create a circular economy for plastic:

 

EMF

The New Plastic Economy initiative is underpinned by a common vision for a circular economy for plastic, and delivered by two key voluntary mechanisms:

  • By signing the Global Commitment, led in collaboration with UNEP, businesses and governments around the world agree to concrete 2025 targets under the vision, and transparent annual reporting on progress.
  • Through the Plastics Pact network, countries and regions bring together key stakeholders within their specific geographical context to drive forward a circular economy for plastic, with clear 2025 targets and annual public reporting.

Each Global Commitment signatory and Plastics Pact member formally endorses the vision and the need to work towards achieving it.

 

Towards a UN Treaty on plastic pollution

The New Plastics Economy initiative has created exciting momentum and is a clear signal to business and policymakers that transitioning from a linear to a circular economy for plastic is a priority. But this cannot be achieved through voluntary commitments alone. An international framework for action is needed.

 

In November 2020, together with WWF and the Boston Consulting Group, the Ellen MacArthur Foundation launched a call for a UN Treaty on plastic pollution, alongside a report setting out the opportunity, and a business manifesto signed by 45 leading companies.

 

Objectives

Through collaboration and alignment behind a common vision, achieve tangible steps towards a circular economy for plastics.

 

Partners

Lead Philanthropic Partner: Eric & Wendy Schmidt Fund for Strategic Innovation

Philanthropic Partner: Oak Foundation 

Initiative partners: Amcor, Borealis, The Coca-Cola Company, Danone, L’Oreal, MARS, Nestlé, PepsiCo, Unilever, Veolia and Walmart 

 

Contact

Website

 

 

Partner Logos
New Plastics Economy Image Ellen Macarthur

Global Plastic Action Partnership

This Action aligns with the following Calls to Action from the Circular Economy Action Agenda for Plastics

2. Incentivize and Support Product Design for Reuse and Recycling of Plastic

4. Stimulate Consumer Adoption of Plastic Reuse

5. Guide and Support New Business Models for Environmental, Financial, and Social Triple-Win

9. Integrate and Advance Decent Work in the Transition to a Circular Economy for Plastics

 

Project description

The Global Plastics Action Partnership (GPAP) was forged as a structured global public-private partnership for action on plastic that enables public, private and civil society sectors and their initiatives to come together. As such, GPAP provides a platform for discussion and collaboration amongst the range of emerging efforts to jointly support governments facing plastic pollution challenges – particularly in developing or emerging economies. To enable this, GPAP will also advance structured action through focused proof-of-concept partnerships in ASEAN, Africa and SIDS. Representing three different “archetypes”, these focused partnerships will demonstrate the varying approaches to tackling plastics pollution in profoundly different geographies and economic contexts.

 

Context

  • We are on a path to having more plastics than fish in the ocean by 2050

  • In low and middle-income countries, waste is often disposed in unregulated dumps or openly burned, creating health, safety, and environmental risks

  • The past year has seen a wave of growing interest and commitment to tackling plastic pollution from global to national, business and small-scale initiatives

  • To maximize impact and advance systemic change, scaled action and collaboration between the diverse stakeholders and efforts are needed

 

Long term ambition of the Global Plastic Action Partnership 

Avert plastic pollution from source to sea by 2025, by fast-tracking circular economy solutions and catalysing concerted solutions.

 

Objectives

  • Build and grow a public-private partnership to help translate political and corporate commitment to address plastic pollution into tangible strategies and investible actions plans

  • Translate into national platforms that develop fact-based national action plans

  • Conduct pilots in three countries and scale up to other countries

  • Capture and exchange insights for rapid replication and scale

 

National Plastics Action Partnership 

Indonesia 

  • With more than 150 member organizations, the Indonesia NPAP is the country's leading platform for public-private collaboration, working closely with leading changemakers from all sectors to forge a collective path towards a plastic pollution-free Indonesia. 

Vietnam 

  • As the new chair of ASEAN in 2020, Viet Nam is committed to leading the way for the broader South-East Asia region in developing and implementing meaningful policies to address plastic waste and pollution. Under the National Action Plan on Marine Plastic Debris Management, the country has pledged to reduce the flow of plastics into the ocean by 75% by 2030, and to boost the sustainable growth of its marine economy. 

Ghana  

  • The Ghana NPAP serves as the national platform for multistakeholder cooperation, facilitating initiatives and funding to scale up and accelerate in-country partnerships that address plastic waste and pollution while contributing to the nation’s progress towards achieving many of the Sustainable Development Goals. 

Nigeria

  • In joining GPAP, Nigeria will work with the World Economic Forum to launch a National Plastic Action Partnership, based on a promising model that has been piloted in Indonesia, Ghana and Viet Nam. Its principal mandates will include creating and working with locally led, locally driven platforms, such as the Federal Ministry of Environment and the African Development Bank-coordinated Nigeria Circular Economy Working Group (NCEWG), to bring together the country’s most influential policy-makers, business leaders and civil society advocates. The goal is to deliver a national action plan for radically reducing plastic pollution, connecting high-potential solutions with strategic financing opportunities. 

 

Partners

World Economic Forum (leading partner)

Government of Canada

UK Defra

PepsiCo

The CocaCola Company

GEF

Nestlé

Dow